FaceTime

This is what I like to call my ‘at sea concerned face’ This is the face of a woman afloat in the Tasman sea who has just been told by their kayaking partner who is in charge of the rudder, that they have never been in a kayak, are afraid of water and have no sense of direction.

The forehead of concern

The forehead of concern

 

My role as navigator and photographer also included chief side panic paddler. A zig zagged kayak hour later this trilogy of worry played out as we landed ourselves on the only rock in the sea. We also got ourselves off the only rock in the sea, before zig zagging towards Adele Island for some seal spotting. I’m averaging a seal every 16-24 hours at the moment,  so it was time for my next fix.

Kayaking around the park, kayak selfie, Adele Island

Kayaking around the park, kayak selfie, Adele Island

My East Midlands value for money mentality perspective is seeing this as a free adventurous rocky  terrain add-on to the morning’s sea kayaking around Abel Tasman National Park.

Having a swim post kayaking in Watering Cove, selfie, off to Adele Island

Having a swim post kayaking in Watering Cove, selfie, off to Adele Island

Luckily the 4 hour hike back to Marahau  was through the dense national park forest on a designated directional, less rocky and firmly signposted path.

Hike back to Marahau, stopping at Yellow Cove beach, view from the top

Hike back to Marahau, stopping at Yellow Cove beach, view from the top

Abel Tasman National Park

Abel Tasman National Park views near Marahau

4 thoughts on “FaceTime

  1. My wife and I decided that our marriage was too important to buy a double kayak! Whilst the stern paddler usually controls the rudder, the one in front has the advantage of being able to shovel water on the head of the one behind.

    Stewart

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